Tag Archives: grease ice

The sea ice forms

Strong wind and a trail of grease ice, 2 March

Strong wind and a trail of grease ice, 2 March

Last month has been damn cold. Our last decent blow (87km/hr / 46 knot gusts) was the first few days of March, since then, the wind has averaged under eight knots. When we get the big weather systems come through, obviously the wind chill makes it unpleasant to go outside but in fact the temperature rises by a few degrees. This blow in March however had temperatures several degrees below freezing and we had some grease ice trails form, originating in the shallow sheltered water against the cold rocks and drifting off downwind. And so it began…

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Summer skies

The day time sky offers much beauty and intrigue, particularly in Antarctica. Many of the optical phenomena can be seen all over the world by those with a little knowledge of what to look for and an interest in observing nature. But given the extreme physical conditions in Antarctica, there are a few things which are a little special and unique to places like this. As you can probably tell based on the content of my recent icy news article, for me it is a key aspect of the Antarctic experience. Now we are on the winter side of the equinox (this morning has been the coldest so far, -27.6C), I thought it would be a good time to put together my photos of the summer sky.

Approaching Davis, 1 Dec 2012

Approaching Davis, 1 Dec 2012

The oft quoted Albert Einstein talks about kindness, beauty, and truth. So with regard to the latter, during this post I’ll be sneakily diverging off on physics and weather tangents. As one of the dieso’s on base said, “I never thought I’d learn so much….” – neither did we, Aaron, neither did we. (With all his cheeky met bashing, I have to keep him honest sometimes!)

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